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Functional Safety Hardware News – October 2018

Every month, we search the web for relevant safety-critical news content and send you the top 10 stories in this newsletter. Here are the latest functional safety headlines for September 2018.

DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: https://semiengineering.com

INTEGRATING RESULTS AND COVERAGE FROM SIMULATION AND FORMAL

Not so long ago, formal verification was considered an exotic technology used only by specialists for specific verification challenges such as cache coherency. As chips have grown ceaselessly in size and complexity, the traditional verification method of simulation could not keep pace. The task of generating and running enough tests consumed enormous resources in terms of engineers, simulation licenses, and servers. Yet even unlimited simulation capability provided no guarantee of functional correctness. Constrained-random simulation, by its very nature, is probabilistic and has little chance of exercising enough of the design to find deep, corner-case bugs 


DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: https://www.eetimes.com

ADAS RADAR OFFERS BACKUP AND PERIL

There has been enough standardization of assertion formats and enough tools available to help convert requirements to assertions that the verification team don’t have to write every bit of every set of assertions by hand using, according to Tom Anderson, technical marketing consultant at OneSpin Solutions.


DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: https://semiengineering.com

DATA CONVERTERS FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS

Sensor applications requiring data converters range from temperature sensors identifying different engine status to radar/LIDAR enabling Automotive Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Other applications involving data converters include wireless transceivers for communicating with other vehicles or with a fixed network. The data converter IP (analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog) provides an interface for multitude of analog sensors to automotive system-on-chips (SoCs). For ADAS, the electronic systems and their components, like SoC and IP, must deliver the utmost in reliability and safety, while enduring extreme temperature ranges and demonstrating longevity. Due to this reason, automotive electronic systems and their components must adhere to a set of stringent automotive standards for reliability and functional safety.


DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: http://embedded-computing.com

SOLVING CRITICAL CHALLENGES OF AUTONOMOUS DRIVING

To enable advanced driver assistance systems and infotainment systems—in addition to existing functions—cars will need to move information with lower latency and higher bandwidth. Many companies are trying to expand Ethernet’s uses for automotive applications, taking advantage of recent improvements to its timing and reliability. But before the standard takes over the car’s network, it needs to get faster.


DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: https://semiengineering.com

ADDING SAFETY INTO AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

The technology of “autonomous driving” is building upon specific driver-assistance functions like adaptive cruise control or collision avoidance, temporary supervised auto-pilot, to fully self-driving vehicles capable of completing journeys from beginning to end with no human intervention at all.


DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: https://semiengineering.com

AUTOMOTIVE SAFETY REQUIREMENTS IMPACT ECOSYSTEM

As activity by the automotive industry ramps to include sophisticated electronics for things like electrification and autonomous features, the changes that have already begun across the automotive supply chain in support of these are driving up complexity for semiconductor design teams on an exponential scale.


DATE: Oct 2018 | SOURCE: https://www.eetimes.com

HOW TO NOT FAIL ISO 26262

In the move towards autonomous driving cars and the implementation of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), ISO 26262 functional safety standards have been thrust to the forefront of system design. Understanding and correctly implementing an ISO 26262 compliance program can mean the difference between economic success and failure.

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